We are
Marshall County’s
storyteller!

We are
Marshall County’s
storyteller!

Located in the center of town, the Museum is the “HUB” of downtown Plymouth.

The Marshall County Museum fills everyone’s niche.

Discover

… the historic coast-to-coast highways that made Marshall County…the Crossroads!

Experience

… intriguing exhibits up close and hands-on.

Be Surprised

… by famous figures who have passed
through Marshall County!

Encounter

… constantly changing events and activities.

Reminisce

… about things and people that make you SMILE!

Explore

… Marshall County’s architectural wonders!

Mission Statement

“Looking Back… Moving Forward”
to educate, collect stories,
preserve & create experiences
about Marshall County’s history.

Kites-A-Flying

Spring is a time of year when the days get warmer and longer, and
there can be some very windy days. And windy days are a great
time to make and fly a kite. The body of a box kite can catch the
wind inside, causing it to rise above your head and fly from side to
side.
Sometimes it takes a little practice to keep a kite flying, but if you
watch the streamers (or tail), you can tell which way the wind is
blowing. That will help you make decisions about which direction to aim your kite. Do you
think you should run against the wind or with the wind to keep your kite flying? Try it both
ways and see what you think. Talk to an adult about what you learned

Share your discoveries with us on social media using #MCMuseumFromHome.

Click this link to download the PDF—>Kites-A-Flying!

Candy Rock Cycle

Rocks are some of the oldest things on earth. In fact, you could say that the earth itself is
just a huge rock and everything else sits on it. Rocks do make up the crust of the earth,
but there are many types of rocks – not just one.

The three main types of rock are sedimentary, metamorphic and
igneous. Each type is formed in a different way. The rock cycle
describes how each type of rock has the potential to become a
different type of rock, whether through weathering and erosion,
cementation and compaction, heat and pressure, or melting and
cooling.

Knowing the rock cycle helps us understand how our planet is
always recycling itself. Besides, it can help you know where the
rock you dug up in your yard, or found on vacation, may have once
been.

This activity brochure is available as a PDF to print at home. To access, click this link —> Candy Rock Cycle

Let’s Play I SPY

Do you like a good riddle? In addition to being fun, riddles can help us to use our brains in new ways as we try to figure them out. One kind of riddle uses a rhyming couplet to give you clues. A rhyming couplet is two sentences that rhyme at the end. Try to solve the riddles in our activity.

Share your discoveries with us on social media using #MCMuseumFromHome.

This activity packet is available as a PDF to print at home. To access, click this link —> Let’s Play I SPY

Dirt Discovery

Plain old dirt is a very important ingredient in growing plants in a garden. Do you know what the dirt around your house is made of? What is in your dirt has a big impact on how well plants grow in it.

Dirt is made up of two types of material: minerals and organic matter. Minerals come mostly from rocks that get ground up into very tiny pieces due to the forces of nature, like wind and water wearing them away. Organic matter is made from living things like leaves, plants and insects that die and decay. For example, when dead leaves fall apart in the dirt, they feed the soil and help new plants grow.

The gardener’s word for dirt is SOIL, and the texture, or feel, of the soil can be clay-like, sandy, silty (a very fine texture), loamy (a combination of several soils), or maybe even rocky. Some soils are good for plants. Some soils are less good. How can you know if your soil will grow things?

Share your discoveries with us on social media using #MCMuseumFromHome.

Click this link to download the PDF

Dirt Discovery

Counting on the Presidents

Abraham Lincoln appears on the penny, Thomas Jefferson is on the nickel, Franklin D.
Roosevelt is featured on the dime, George Washington adorns the quarter and John F.
Kennedy is honored on the half-dollar. Ever wonder how certain presidents ended up
being featured on American coins? Why presidents? Why not places or things? Why not
animals or stars and planets?

Share what you learned with us on social media using #MCMuseumFromHome

This activity packet is available as a PDF to print at home. To access, click this link —>Counting on the Presidents

Planting for Pollinators

Bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, bats, hummingbirds, and even some small mammals (like
squirrels) play a role in giving plants a hand, but they need all the help they can get. You
can help by planting flowers in your yard that attract pollinators.
In our activity, we have some kinds of plants that will attract pollinators to your yard.
Look at the list and pick ones that you would like to grow

Share your discoveries with us on social media using #MCMuseumFromHome.

This activity packet is available as a PDF to print at home. To access, click this link —> Planting for Pollinators

Contact Us

TERMS

PRIVACY


FIND US

123 N Michigan St.
Plymouth, IN 46563


(574) 936-2306


Tuesday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Closed Sundays, Mondays
& County Holidays


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Marshall County Historical Society, Museum & Crossroads Center is handicap accessible.